War of 1812 grave site in downtown Detroit receives historical marker

This is the intersection in downtown Detroit where the historical marker was erected.

DETROIT (AP) — A War of 1812 grave site, discovered in the 1980s during an archaeological survey ahead of the People Mover’s construction, was recently commemorated with a historical marker in downtown Detroit.

A years-long effort to raise money and plan for the marker’s dedication culminated with a small crowd of about 21 people standing in the median of Washington Boulevard, across the street from the Westin Book Cadillac Hotel, near the intersection with Michigan Avenue.

“I’m very thankful that this Michigan War of 1812 marker was installed,” Jim McConnell, of the Michigan War of 1812 Bicentennial Commission, told The Detroit Free Press. “The story of Detroit in the War of 1812 is truly an amazing story.”

The War of 1812 was “caused by British restrictions on U.S. trade and America’s desire to expand its territory,” according to History.com. During the conflict, Fort Detroit had been surrendered to the British “without a fight,” according to the website.

The marker explains what happened later:

“War of 1812 Grave Site: In reaction to (American naval commander) Oliver Hazard Perry’s Lake Erie victory, the British withdrew from Detroit on September 26, 1813, setting fire to the buildings within the fort and the Citadel. Three days later, United States troops returned to a city that lacked housing and food supplies.

“A disease, probably cholera, broke out among the soldiers. By December 1, 1813, an estimated 1,300 of them were ill. The medical supplies were soon depleted: conditions worsened. When coffins became unobtainable, many soldiers were buried in a common grave at this site. Some 700 may have died before the epidemic finally ran its course.

“This grave site was identified in 1987 during an archaeological survey for the People Mover that found four burials associated with the War of 1812.”

McConnell worked with the United States Daughters of 1812 Michigan State Society, which had reached out to help him make the marker a reality. Grace Smith, the society’s president, stood at the dedication ceremony wearing 10 medals with names of her ancestors who fought in the War of 1812.

“Most of them were in New York. I had one (ancestor) who died at Fort Meigs, Ohio, and the others lived normal lives,” Smith said. “We pay tribute to them; it’s important to us.”

The Free Press reported in July 1984 that the bones of two humans were found in the path of the future People Mover, near the Michigan Avenue Station.

“About 500 American soldiers died during a typhus epidemic in 1814, the year after the city was reclaimed from British capture during the War of 1812. Their bodies were placed in shallow graves on what was then a military reservation,” the Free Press reported.

The marker was developed with a local partnership that also involved the Detroit Historical Society, Michigan Historical Center and the office of Detroit City Councilor Raquel Castaneda-Lopez, in whose district the marker is located.

“We honor our veterans, and these men all died in Detroit during the War of 1812. We have to honor them; we do it by putting up a monument or having a ceremony,” Smith said. “At least they won’t be forgotten.”

Woman sent to hospital after swerving to miss deer & hitting tree

CASS COUNTY, Mich. — A woman has been hospitalized after the vehicle she was driving struck a tree Sunday morning.

Cass County Sheriff Richard Behnke reports that at 4:45 a.m. Sunday his office investigated a personal injury crash that occurred on Savage Road near Born Street in Newburg Township. The investigation showed that Misty Barnes, 51, of Three Rivers was driving northbound on Savage when a deer ran out in front of her vehicle. She swerved to avoid the deer, lost control and her vehicle went off the roadway and struck a tree.

Barnes was transported to Bronson Hospital in Kalamazoo where no condition report was available later Sunday.

It is believed that seat belts were used and that alcohol was not a factor in the accident.

Assisting at the scene were the SEPSA ambulance service, Newburg ambulance service and Newburg Fire Department.

The crash remains under investigation by the Cass County Sheriff’s Department.

Here’s when the wet and humid pattern will break

RICHMOND, Va. — A stubborn area of low pressure will continue to send waves of moisture at us through Monday.  It will not rain this entire time, but there will be batches of showers and storms at times.  Due to the high humidity, locally heavy downpours are possible.

A warm front will lift north of the area on Monday, allowing highs to jump into the low and mid 80s.  An approaching cold front will trigger more showers and storms later in the day.  If we get some breaks for sun, some strong storms with heavy rainfall will be possible.

After the cold front passes Monday night, showers will exit Tuesday morning.  We will see sunshine and lower humidity Tuesday afternoon.

Our next system will spread rain in from the south later Wednesday.  It will turn a bit more humid Wednesday night into Thursday.  Yet another cold front will pass Thursday with scattered showers and storms.  Behind this front, it will be dry and less humid for Friday.

A couple of computer models are showing the chance for a few showers next weekend (mostly on Saturday).  However, an ensemble of models are indicating high pressure will build in and keep us dry Friday through much of Sunday.  We will continue to update the forecast this week.

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Malema promises to speak about ‘powerful SA family’ in Botswana ‘plot’ against government

EFF leader Julius Malema on Sunday added weight to growing accusations against the Motsepe family that they have been involved in the politics of Botswana’s ruling party.

It’s not yet known what Malema will say, except that his tweet on Sunday suggested he believes there is a “plot to remove the current Botswana government by some members of a powerful South African family”. He said he would speak about it at his Youth Day rally next Sunday.

Some would say the wheel has come full circle, as Malema was ejected from the ANC, along with other ANC Youth League members, in part for comments that were construed at the time as calling for regime change in Botswana. He was also slapped with restrictions to his ability to visit Botswana.

Botswana’s Sunday Standard this week faced threats of a multimillion-rand lawsuit against it from South African billionaire Patrice Motsepe after they had earlier published allegations that Motsepe was funding a faction in the Botswana Democratic Party to influence who would be the next president – allegations that Motsepe strongly denies.

The newspaper had published an article on April 1 claiming that the billionaire and his sister, businesswoman Bridgette Motsepe-Radebe, donated or perhaps had pledged to donate R22 million to Dr Pelonomi Venson-Moitoi’s campaign.

Venson-Moitoi is an ally of former president Ian Khama, who is challenging Mokgweetsi Masisi for the party’s presidency.

Motsepe’s sister subsequently had restrictions placed on her passport by the Botswana government, and now needs a visa if she wants to visit her mining interests in the country.

After initially withdrawing their claims against the billionaire, the newspaper in its latest issue doubled down, with yet another front-page article alleging that Motsepe had pledged money to “oust Masisi”. Malema also retweeted a screenshot of the Sunday Standard’s front page today.

Motsepe last month secured a temporary interdict preventing Black First Land First (BLF) and its leader Andile Mngxitama from accusing him of involvement in plotting a coup in Botswana.

At a press conference last month, the BLF leader had accused Bridgette Radebe-Motsepe of attempting to influence the politics in Botswana’s ruling party.

Motsepe then took issue with Mngxitama having alleged that his sister had ambitions to take over the diamond industry in Botswana and that she and Motsepe had together been involved in an alleged plot in the country to that end.

Motsepe’s lawyers, however, said: “These remarks are all untruthful.”

They added that Mngxitama’s comments were injurious to their client’s dignity, were offensive, derogatory, hurtful, and exposed their client to general disesteem and ill-will.

The case concluded with Judge Thifhelimbilu Mudau ruling that Mngxitama and the party should cease to make accusations about Motsepe, which Mngxitama had mostly based on the report in the Sunday Standard, and that they should remove all their published statements about it.

It’s understood that Motsepe is still looking to make the interdict permanent, and may sue for damages.

Mngxitama today took to Facebook to post further comments about the matter, however, writing: “Did you know that the current president of Botswana, Dr Masisi, is involved in a bitter battle with De Beers over the Botswana diamonds? Did you know De Beers is an Oppenheimer operation? And who is friends with the Oppenheimers? Do you get it why Patrice Motsepe may be funding regime change in Botswana? Take it back home; do you remember who marched against Zuma? Well, Sipho Pityana is an Oppenheimer man chairing one of its operations … and who is family friends of Motsepe?”

When asked if his comment was not possibly a violation of the court interdict, Mngxitama said: “Read in context, no. I’m not accusing him. I’m merely commenting on what the media is reporting, and the media is showing strongly that we didn’t lie or deliberately want to harm Motsepe.”

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More rain, with some of it heavy, ahead for Sunday

WEST MICHIGAN — A great day of weather on Saturday, not so great for today.  Expect periods of rain to go through this afternoon and into the overnight tonight. Rain amounts of 0.50″-1.25″ will be common but localized amounts could exceed 2″ in some cases. A rumble of thunder or a strike of lightning will be possible later this afternoon into this evening and overnight but severe weather will not be occurring. Temperatures will not get much higher than about 70 degrees this afternoon underneath cloudy skies. Expect rain to completely exit by mid-late morning on Monday.

As this weather system begins to exit our region, winds will begin to pick up through the morning hours tomorrow. A Lakeshore Flood Watch goes into effect for lakeshore communities of Berrien, Van Buren, Allegan, and Ottawa Counties at 5 A.M. Monday and lasts until 8 P.M. Monday. 3 to 6 foot waves may lead to lakeshore flooding and beach erosion. Northwest winds are to be brisk at 15-25 mph with some gusts around 35 mph or so.

A much cooler day is in the forecast for Monday with highs only reaching the upper 60s despite abundant sunshine returning through the afternoon. Tuesday looks to bring very nice weather conditions back to West Michigan as sunshine is to dominate helping to push daytime highs back into the middle 70s.

Most of Wednesday should shake out rain-free as well, but our next rain-maker will be knocking on the door by late day into the evening. Highs on Wednesday reach the lower half of the 70s underneath partly sunny skies. Wednesday evening brings an increasing risk for scattered showers and even a few thunderstorms as we go along.

This disturbance looks to be rather slow-moving and will just kind of spiral over the Great Lakes keeping showers going into Thursday. The added clouds and a cool atmosphere overhead in association with this low pressure system will mean very cool mid-June highs in the lower 60s on Thursday. Models begin to diverge as to how things will play out for Friday into Saturday with some models showing many dry hours while other models continue the risk for a shower in an overall unsettled upper-air pattern. Temperatures, however, do look to bounce back into the lower to middle 70s by next weekend.

Eastern Michigan hotel is free to anyone traveling for an abortion

YALE, Mich. — In recent months, states across the country have been passing laws designed to make it harder — and in some cases, nearly impossible — to get an abortion.

So Shelley O’Brien, manager of The Yale Hotel in the tiny eastern Michigan town of Yale, made an offer to anyone traveling out of their state for the procedure: Come to Michigan and stay at her hotel for free.

“Dear sisters that live in Alabama, Ohio, Georgia, Arkansas, Missouri, or any of the other states that follow with similar laws restricting access, We cannot do anything about the way you are being treated in your home-state,” the post reads.

“But, if you can make it to Michigan, we will support you with several nights lodging, and transportation to and from your appointment,” the post reads.

It was a bold stance for the mother of three to take in her largely conservative town that’s home to fewer than 2,000 people. But O’Brien said she felt it was important.

“Women should have autonomy over their own bodies,” she said. “If we do not have control over our own bodies, then this is not a free world.”

The Yale Hotel’s Facebook post has since received thousands of shares and hundreds of comments. Responses have been mostly positive, O’Brien said, though she has gotten some pushback from online trolls and others.

So far, O’Brien said no one has taken her up on the offer, though she has a room ready for anyone who needs it. She said she’s calling it “Jane’s Room” — a nod to Jane Roe, the pseudonym for Norma McCorvey, the plaintiff in the landmark Supreme Court case Roe v. Wade.

The offer has, however, been good for business. In the weekend after she made the post on Facebook, she said she made $400 more than the week before.

In the past few months, Alabama passed a near-total ban on abortion, while states including Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi and Ohio have passed “heartbeat” bills that ban abortions after a fetal heartbeat can be detected.

Earlier this week, Republicans in the Michigan state Senate introduced bills that would punish doctors for performing abortions after a fetal heartbeat can be detected. The Republican-led House and Senate also voted in May to ban a common second-trimester abortion procedure and make it a felony for physicians to perform it, except to save a patient’s life.

Michigan’s Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer has said she would veto bills that restrict abortion access, and a group called Right to Life of Michigan plans to launch a petition to bypass her promised veto.

Erasmus, Makaringe and Motshwari out of final Afcon squad

Baxter cut three players from the 28 men squad he had called up initially. Keagan Dolly had to withdraw through injury while Rivaldo Coetzee left camp because of personal reasons.

Kermit Erasmus, Ben Motshwari and Fourtune Makaringe didn’t make the final squad set to travel to Egypt later this month for the Afcon.

Bafana Bafana will play against Ivory Coast in their opening match on June 24.

Squad

Goalkeepers:

Darren Keet, Ronwen Williams, Bruce Bvuma

Defenders:

Thulani Hlatshwayo, Buhle Mkhwanazi, Sifiso Hlanti, Thamsanqa Mkhize, Ramahlwe Mphahlele, Innocent Maela, Daniel Cardoso,

Midfielders:

Bongani Zungu, Kamohelo Mokotjo, Dean Furman, Hlompho Kekana, Tiyani Mabunda, Thulani Serero, Thembinkosi Lorch, Lebogang Maboe, Themba Zwane.

Forwards:

Percy Tau, Lebo Mothiba, Sibusiso Vilakazi, Lars Veldwijk.

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Border Patrol Agent Rescues Migrant Mother And Young Son From Swarm Of Bees

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GOP Rep. Scolds Trump Over Pelosi Swipe In Normandy: ‘Should Be Above That’

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How the crisis in Sudan unfolded

The deadly crackdown by security forces on protesters in Sudan follows a building standoff between the ruling military and demonstrators demanding civilian rule.

The unrest started in December 2018, when citizens revolted against a tripling of the price of bread.

In April demonstrators launched a sit-in in front of the military headquarters in Khartoum to demand the departure of the regime of long-time president Omar al-Bashir.

He was ousted by the army a few days later, but the protesters remained in place in their thousands to press their demand for the military to cede power.

On June 3 security forces broke up the sit-in, launching a crackdown that left more than 100 dead in just a few days.

Here is a summary of events leading up to the military’s move to end the long-running protest.

– Talks break down –

On May 20, after several breakthroughs, talks between the ruling military council and protest leaders reach a deadlock over who should head a new governing body which should oversee a three-year transition to civilian rule.

Protest leaders insist a civilian must head the new sovereign council and that civilians should make up the majority of its members, proposals rejected by the ruling generals.

Islamist movements back the military in the hope it will keep sharia, Islamic law, in place since a 1989 coup.

On May 28-29, thousands of workers in both the public and private sectors strike across the country to pressure the military rulers.

– Saudi, UAE, Egypt back military –

In late May, the head of the military council, Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, visits Saudi Arabia, Egypt and the United Arab Emirates.

As commander of the country’s ground forces, Burhan is reported to have coordinated the deployment of Sudanese troops within the Saudi-led coalition which intervened in 2015 in Yemen to support the government against Huthi rebels accused of links with Iran.

The three regional powers have thrown their weight behind the Sudanese military for fear of a repeat of the turbulence that followed the Arab Spring in several countries in 2011.

Qatar, however, a long-time ally of Bashir but also a friend to Iran and involved in a bitter dispute with Saudi Arabia and its allies, has seen its influence in Sudan wane since the start of the crisis.

On May 31, the military council closes down the Khartoum bureau of the Qatari news channel Al Jazeera, which regularly broadcasts footage of demonstrations.

There is no reason given for the order.

– Bloody crackdown –

On June 3, men in military fatigues move in on the protest camp outside the army headquarters and disperse the thousands gathered there with force.

More than 100 have been killed and hundreds wounded since the start of the crackdown, according to the Central Committee of Sudanese Doctors, close to the demonstrators.

Internet connectivity is disrupted.

A day later the military announces that all previous agreements with protest leaders on the transition are scrapped and that elections will be called “within a period not exceeding nine months”.

Protesters denounce a putsch.

In Khartoum and across the country, the Rapid Support Forces (RSF) — paramilitaries with origins in the 16-year-old war in the western region of Darfur — are thought to have been behind the crackdown.

They are accused of atrocities, including attacks on hospitals.

The international community demands an end to the violence and resumption of dialogue.

– Civil disobedience –

On June 5, as gunfire crackles across the capital, the army says it is open to negotiations “with no restriction”.

Protest leaders turn down the call for talks with the military council “that kills people”.

Saudi Arabia expresses “great concern” at developments and calls for a resumption of dialogue.

Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo, deputy chief of the ruling military council and head of the RSF, says the country will not be allowed to slip into “chaos”.

Opposition figures are arrested on June 8, a day after meeting Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed who had travelled to Khartoum as a mediator.

On June 9, police fire warning shots and tear gas to disperse demonstrators building roadblocks in the capital, in response to a call by protest leaders for “civil disobedience” across the country.

Markets and shops are closed in several Sudanese towns and cities.

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