‘Central Park Five’ To Trump: Death Penalty Ad Put A ‘Bounty On Our Head’

HuffPost is now part of the Oath family. We (Oath) and our partners need your consent to access your device, set cookies, and use your data, including your location, to understand your interests, provide relevant ads and measure their effectiveness. Oath will also provide relevant ads to you on our partners’ products. Learn More

How Oath and our partners bring you better ad experiences

To give you a better overall experience, we want to provide relevant ads that are more useful to you. For example, when you search for a film, we use your search information and location to show the most relevant cinemas near you. We also use this information to show you ads for similar films you may like in the future. Like Oath, our partners may also show you ads that they think match your interests.

Learn more about how Oath collects and uses data and how our partners collect and use data.

Select ‘OK’ to allow Oath and our partners to use your data, or ‘Manage options’ to review our partners and your choices. Tip: Sign In to save these choices and avoid repeating this across devices. You can always update your preferences in the Privacy Centre.

9 hospitalized when subway car derails in Boston

BOSTON (AP) — A subway car has derailed in Boston, sending nine people to the hospital.

Local emergency officials said none of the injuries are life-threatening.

Officials with the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority said the accident occurred at about 11 a.m. Saturday when a Green Line subway car derailed inside a tunnel near Kenmore Square.

A 10th individual was reported injured but declined treatment. Among the injured was the train’s operator. About 50 firefighters responded to the scene.

Emergency workers said they were told by witnesses that everything went dark and they were thrown around the car.

The cause is under investigation.

The derailment caused major delays on the public transit system.

The accident came as Boston was gearing up for its annual Pride Parade and a Red Sox game at Fenway Park.

Jamaica To Make Historic Debut At Women’s World Cup Amid Inspirational Journey

HuffPost is now part of the Oath family. We (Oath) and our partners need your consent to access your device, set cookies, and use your data, including your location, to understand your interests, provide relevant ads and measure their effectiveness. Oath will also provide relevant ads to you on our partners’ products. Learn More

How Oath and our partners bring you better ad experiences

To give you a better overall experience, we want to provide relevant ads that are more useful to you. For example, when you search for a film, we use your search information and location to show the most relevant cinemas near you. We also use this information to show you ads for similar films you may like in the future. Like Oath, our partners may also show you ads that they think match your interests.

Learn more about how Oath collects and uses data and how our partners collect and use data.

Select ‘OK’ to allow Oath and our partners to use your data, or ‘Manage options’ to review our partners and your choices. Tip: Sign In to save these choices and avoid repeating this across devices. You can always update your preferences in the Privacy Centre.

Hillary Clinton Announces Death Of Brother Tony Rodham

HuffPost is now part of the Oath family. We (Oath) and our partners need your consent to access your device, set cookies, and use your data, including your location, to understand your interests, provide relevant ads and measure their effectiveness. Oath will also provide relevant ads to you on our partners’ products. Learn More

How Oath and our partners bring you better ad experiences

To give you a better overall experience, we want to provide relevant ads that are more useful to you. For example, when you search for a film, we use your search information and location to show the most relevant cinemas near you. We also use this information to show you ads for similar films you may like in the future. Like Oath, our partners may also show you ads that they think match your interests.

Learn more about how Oath collects and uses data and how our partners collect and use data.

Select ‘OK’ to allow Oath and our partners to use your data, or ‘Manage options’ to review our partners and your choices. Tip: Sign In to save these choices and avoid repeating this across devices. You can always update your preferences in the Privacy Centre.

Jennifer Lopez’s Brings Daughter Onstage For Duet On First Night Of Tour

HuffPost is now part of the Oath family. We (Oath) and our partners need your consent to access your device, set cookies, and use your data, including your location, to understand your interests, provide relevant ads and measure their effectiveness. Oath will also provide relevant ads to you on our partners’ products. Learn More

How Oath and our partners bring you better ad experiences

To give you a better overall experience, we want to provide relevant ads that are more useful to you. For example, when you search for a film, we use your search information and location to show the most relevant cinemas near you. We also use this information to show you ads for similar films you may like in the future. Like Oath, our partners may also show you ads that they think match your interests.

Learn more about how Oath collects and uses data and how our partners collect and use data.

Select ‘OK’ to allow Oath and our partners to use your data, or ‘Manage options’ to review our partners and your choices. Tip: Sign In to save these choices and avoid repeating this across devices. You can always update your preferences in the Privacy Centre.

Drug company unit pleads guilty to opioid bribery scheme

BOSTON (AP) — A drug company subsidiary has pleaded guilty to fraud charges stemming from allegations that the manufacturer schemed to bribe doctors to prescribe its highly addictive fentanyl spray.

The guilty plea entered in Boston federal court Friday by Insys Therapeutics’ operating unit is part of a settlement announced this week to resolve investigations into the company.

Chandler, Arizona-based Insys Therapeutics has also agreed to pay $225 million .

Insys Founder John Kapoor and four other former executives were convicted last month of running the bribery scheme. They filed court documents this week challenging their convictions.

Kapoor’s attorneys say the former employees who testified against him weren’t credible.

His lawyers say prosecutors also introduced unfair and irrelevant evidence, including a rap video showing sales representatives dancing around a person dressed as a bottle of the opioid.

Kroger recalls frozen berries that might have hepatitis A

NEW YORK (AP) — Grocery stores owned by Kroger across the country are recalling store-label frozen berries because they might be contaminated with hepatitis A.

There have been no reported illnesses.

The stores include Kroger, Ralphs, Fry’s, Fred Meyer and other chains . The recalled fruitare branded “Private Selection” and include “Frozen Triple Berry Medley” in the 16-oz. and 48-oz. sizes and “Frozen Blackberries” in a 16-oz package.

Kroger announced Friday that it has removed the berries from store shelves, and that customers who have them at home should not eat them.

Hepatitis A, a contagious liver disease, may cause fatigue, stomach pain and jaundice. It can last a few weeks or several months and can cause liver failure in rare cases.

The Food and Drug Administration discovered the contamination.

Tyson recalls over 190,000 chicken fritters

NEW HOLLAND, PA — Tyson Foods announced they are voluntarily recalling thousands of pounds of chicken fritters after consumers reportedly found plastic in the food.

The product is only available commercially, not through retail stores, and has the codes 0599NHL02 and P-1325 from February 28, 2019. Tyson says no other products have been affected.

The poultry giant stated the recall is out of caution and the reports were limited to information from 2 people.

Judge denies GM motion to dismiss suit over worker transfers

YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio (AP) — A federal judge in Ohio has denied General Motors’ request to dismiss a lawsuit filed by the United Auto Workers claiming the company violated the union’s contract by not sending workers to a plant in Indiana.

The Warren Tribune Chronicle reports U.S. District Judge Benita Pearson ruled Friday in Youngstown that a previous union grievance didn’t demand that temporary workers at Fort Wayne be given permanent positions as GM claimed.

A GM spokesman declined to comment Saturday.

The UAW has said GM should have sent workers, including several hundred from a now shuttered assembly plant in Lordstown, Ohio, to the Indiana plant producing the Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra.

About 1,400 union members were working in the Lordstown plant when GM ended production of the Cruze sedan in March.

Backstage heroines in D-Day’s 75th anniversary

OMAHA BEACH, France (AP) — Women didn’t get much of a mention in the 75th anniversary commemorations of D-Day that focused largely on the fighting exploits of men, yet without them Adolf Hitler wouldn’t have been defeated.

Legions of women built weapons of war that men fought and killed with. By ensuring production of planes, tanks and other material, they freed up men sent into combat on all the fronts of World War II.

Women fought, and died, too. French resistance fighter Lucie Aubrac was pregnant when she sprang her husband, Raymond, from Nazi captivity in October 1943. Across France, many schools are named after Aubrac, who died in 2007, aged 94.

Women nursed the wounded and comforted the traumatized.

“If I had to do it over … just like the boys, I’d serve again,” war nurse Leila Morrison, now 96, said as she came back this week to Normandy, where she served in the 118th Evacuation Hospital after nearly 160,000 men landed in Nazi-occupied France on D-Day, June 6, 1944.

“It changed my life completely, my outlook in every direction, and I am so thankful for it,” Morrison told The Associated Press in an interview. “I was just 22 years old, just out of school and never been through anything like this. And it was a real wakeup realization and it stayed with me ever since, every day.”

In short, women were vital cogs in the Allied and Soviet war machines that eventually overpowered those of Germany and Japan. Women were also on the front lines of horror and suffering, with countless numbers subjected to mass rapes by advancing soldiers who often carried love-letters and keep-sakes from sweethearts waiting back home, millions of whom became widows.

The success of the massive air- and seaborne D-Day invasion, commemorated across Normandy this week , was the culmination of a monumental Allied war effort that, from the outset, needed the muscles, intelligence, bravery, fortitude, patience, discretion and self-sacrifice of women, who juggled wartime service with child-care, too, while men fought to free foreign lands.

In the aftermath of the Dec. 7, 1941, Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor that precipitated the United States’ entry into the war, U.S. government fliers told women: “You are needed … NOW.”

“We must depend upon you — upon womanpower,” exhorted a recruitment flier distributed in Mobile, Alabama, in February 1942. “Every housewife should ask herself and answer this question: ‘Can I be of greater service in my home or in a war plant?’”

Jean Harman, then 17 and already taking flying classes when Japan sprang its surprise attack on the U.S. Pacific Fleet, didn’t hesitate to offer up her skills to the WASPs, the pioneering Women Airforce Service Pilots whose array of noncombat flight missions released male pilots for battle.

“World War II was a righteous war. We were scared to death that Germany was going to win, take over Europe and then come after us,” Harman, now 94, said in an AP phone interview from her home in California. “I don’t know anybody who didn’t try to do something patriotic during the war.”

The toughest aspect of being a WASP was “being accepted,” she said. “The men were not universally accepting of us flying.”

The success of D-Day and the Allied victory in the attritional Battle of Normandy that followed spelled the beginning of the end for the WASPs. On Oct. 1, 1944, the U.S. army wrote to the 1,074 women graduates of the WASP training program that they were being disbanded.

“When we needed you, you came through,” Air Force Gen. Henry Arnold wrote . “But now the war situation has changed and the time has come when your volunteered services are no longer needed.”

“We were just dumped,” Harman said. “One day we were employed, the next day we were not. We had to pay our own way to wherever we were going next. We had no severance pay. It was just, ‘That’s it girls.’”

On their first job, in October 1942, they ferried 65-horsepower light Piper ‘Cub’ planes from the Lock Haven, Pennsylvania, factory to Mitchel Field on Long Island.

From there, women went on to pilot almost every type of wartime plane, including the massive B-29 Superfortress, used in August 1945 to drop atom bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, precipitating Japan’s surrender and the end of the war, and swift P-51 Mustang fighters that safeguarded heavy bombers on raids to Berlin and back.

Women ferried over 50% of the combat aircraft within the United States , flying from 126 bases. Planes that dropped paratroopers on D-Day, bombed German defenses and strafed Panzer units may well have been flown first by women from factories on their way to the front, where men were at the controls.

“We didn’t have the means to fight that war when we started. We had to scramble for everything we could to get men, ships, ammunition, etc., to the front to fight,” said Sarah Byrn Rickman, author of “The Originals,” about the women fliers. “The women stepped in and filled a gap that made this possible.”

“Without the women, could we have won the war? Probably, a whole lot longer,” she added. “But who knows? Their role was vital.”

Thirty-eight of the women were killed in wartime service. But long considered civilians, not members of the military, they weren’t entitled to the pay and benefits men got. Only in 1977, after a long fight, did they get veteran status, followed in 2010 with the Congressional Gold Medal , the highest civilian honor given by Congress.

Out of a job, Harman married a naval officer. He got flight training; she invested herself in rearing a family.

“We had babies for the next five years and that was it, you know, that part of my life was over,” she said. “With four kids, we didn’t have the money or that for me to do any flying later, just for fun.”