P&G is testing refillable containers for Olay

Procter & Gamble wants to make its products more sustainable. So it’s testing refillable packages for Olay moisturizer later this year.

Starting in October and running until the end of 2019, people will be able to buy the Olay Regenerist Whip moisturizer in a refillable package, the company shared during a Sustainable Brands conference in Detroit on Wednesday.

The container, which can only be purchased online through the Olay website in the United States and the United Kingdom, will be filled with the moisturizer and come with a pod made of polypropylene, a type of plastic that is recyclable. That pod can be used to refill the jar. The current packaging for the product is made of a durable plastic that is generally not recyclable.

Several big companies are exploring greener versions of their products as people become increasingly aware of the environmental harm caused by packaging waste. P&G is also participating in Loop, a shopping service that offers hundreds of products (made by P&G, PepsiCo, Nestlé and others) in reusable packages. Kroger and Walgreens recently joined the experimental new project as well.

P&G started working on the renewable Olay package last year, Anitra Marsh, associate director of brand communications for P&G skin and personal care, told CNN Business. She said that the company decided to test a reusable container with the Regenerist Whip moisturizer because the product is marketed to women in their 20s and 30s, and customers of that age are particularly concerned about the environment.

The product will be shipped in a container made of recycled paper and will arrive without an outer carton in order to reduce packaging, P&G said.

P&G said it will look at consumer feedback to determine whether and how to move forward with the refillable product.

Richmond Police investigating Northside shooting

RICHMOND, Va. —  Richmond Police are investigating a shooting in Richmond’s Northside.

Around 3 p.m. on Wednesday, police responded to the 2800 block of Moss Side Avenue for a shooting.

Once on scene they found a man suffering from an apparent gunshot wound.

He was transported to a local hospital with a non-life-threatening injury.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 804-780-1000.

Jennifer Lawrence Reveals One Clever Way To Get Sophie Turner To Cry On Command

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Senator Tammy Duckworth Says Trump Has A ‘Yellow Streak Down His Back’

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Twitter Shreds Plans For A ‘Straight Pride’ Celebration In Boston

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Economics expert warns tariffs on Mexico would hurt Michigan

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. — President Donald Trump’s proposed tariffs on Mexico would take a serious economic toll on Michigan, according to an economics expert at Grand Valley State University.

“Where we’re at right now, those prices will likely be passed onto consumers very quickly,” says Dr. Paul Isely, the associate dean at the Seidman College of Business at GVSU.

Trump plans to impose a 5% tariff on all goods from Mexico, starting Monday. The goal is to get Mexican leaders to do something to stop the flow of illegal immigrants from Central America into the United States. The tariffs would increase by 5% until October, when the maximum of 25% is reached.

Trump says once the problem is “remedied,” the tariffs will be lifted.

Isely says it’s difficult to tell if these tariffs will successfully curb illegal immigration because using tariffs in this way is unprecedented.

“We don’t know if it’s effective because no one’s really ever used a tariff to address things that don’t deal with the trade of goods,” Isely says.

Isely says Michigan will be uniquely impacted.

“We know that it’s going to become more expensive to produce automobiles,” Isely says. “We know that gasoline prices are going to be higher than they would without them and we know that the markets available to farmers from West Michigan is going to shrink. The combination of those three things is not good for West Michigan.”

With one in five Michigan jobs related to the car industry, Michigan would be one of the hardest hit states, according to Isely. He fears it would lead to layoffs by the end of 2019 and potentially something worse.

“My team is still looking at the probability of a recession really growing very quickly as we exit this year,” Isely says. “These types of tariffs actually pull that probability up.”

Isely says the only ones who will be impacted more than American consumers are the Mexican people, which could defeat the purpose of what Isely says is becoming a trade war.

“Interestingly enough, if you slow down the economy in Mexico, there becomes an incentive for people in Mexico to try to be in the United States and that exacerbates the immigration issue that he’s trying to solve,” Isely says.

Some Republicans in Congress are speaking out against the tariffs. In order to block them, 67 senators in the Republican-controlled chamber would need to vote against the president.

Woman’s error doubles credit card debt

CALEDONIA, Mich. — Kerri Bartz said trying to save money actually ended up doubling her credit card debt. The Caledonia woman tried using a credit card with zero interest to pay off another card.

In early March, Bartz said she wanted to pay off her Chase Amazon credit card to avoid paying monthly interest. To do that, she signed up for an interest-free credit card through Ollo.

Ollo wrote a check to pay off the Chase balance of $1,234.49. Here’s the problem: that check ended up with the wrong company. She admits she made a mistake.

“What I did wrong was I put Amazon’s address (instead of Chase),” Bartz said.

She has a letter from Chase that states the check “did not post to your account because Amazon received it and cashed it.”

“So now I owe Ollo $1,234, and I also owe Chase Amazon $1,234,” she said.

“We’re barely making it. We need that money back,” Bartz explained.

Despite calling each company to try to rectify the situation, she said she “can’t get anywhere with the people who will actually answer the phone.”

Bartz said she tried cancelling the Ollo transaction within six days but was repeatedly told to wait 30 days. Three months later, she said the money is still unaccounted for. The Problem Solvers had her check her Amazon account gift card balance which shows a zero.

So the Problem Solvers emailed Amazon corporate, explained Bartz’ dilemma, and asked someone to investigate. We also messaged Ollo through Twitter and received an email address to send over pertinent information.

Bart said, “I’ve spent hours and hours and hours on the phone, and they tell me to talk to this person. They keep pointing the finger at somebody else, and I can’t get anybody to give me my money back.”

South Haven nonprofits offer summer program

SOUTH HAVEN, Mich. —A group of nonprofits have created a program to help kids participate in summer programs in South Haven.

The South Haven Kids’ Collaborative is offering a schedule of summer programs around te area through partnerships with local nonprofits and organizations.

A schedule of the programs can be found at:

  • South Haven elementary schools
  • South Haven Center for the Arts
  • Liberty Hyde Bailey Museum
  • South Haven Chamber of Commerce
  • South Haven Visitors Bureau
  • South Haven City Hall

Children can be registered for the program at:

  • Our Town Players
  • Forever Curious Children’s Museum
  • Foundry Hall
  • Liberty Hyde Bailey Museum
  • South Haven Center for the Arts
  • South Haven Yacht Club Junior Sailing

Anyone with questions can contact Kerry Hagy at 269-637-1040 or Zadie Jackson 269-637-3251.

Walmart is getting rid of its blue vests. Here’s what the new ones look like

From press release: Our new vests have a modernized style that takes advantage of trim detail and screen printing to introduce color in an eye-catching way.

Walmart employees’ vests are getting a bold makeover.

The signature blue vests that Walmart employees have worn for years will be replaced with a modern gray look with a neon blue, green or pink trim. Walmart last redesigned its uniforms in 2014.

The company announced the changes Wednesday during its annual shareholders meeting.

The new vests will be made from recycled bottles and have bigger pockets than previous vests.

The vests are “neutral steel gray,” and most associates will wear bright blue trim. Associates at Walmart’s smaller Neighborhood Market stores will wear green trim. Self-checkout hosts at Walmart Supercenters will wear yellow with gray trim. And in the future, Walmart says employees will be able to choose other colors, including pink.

“Our new vests have a modernized style that takes advantage of trim detail and screen printing to introduce color in an eye-catching way,” Walmart said in a release.

The company said the neon color will help customers more easily spot Walmart associates.

Each vest is stitched with a “proud Walmart associate” on the front and a newly colorful “spark” logo on the back.

The larger pockets will let associates “carry all the equipment they need to do their jobs on the sales floor.” Employees will receive the vests later this year for free and will be able to upgrade them with specialized designs or trims for up to $11.

The new vests come a year after the company announced a more relaxed dress code.

Workers can now wear any solid-colored shirt. Walmart added blue to the mix of approved pants colors, making blue jeans work-appropriate attire. Walmart said the response to those changes have been “amazing.”

Also, the new vests ties together Walmart’s new streamlined appearance that’s seen on its refreshed websitestore remodels and name.